I’ve had RSI in various forms since the late 1990s. Much of this arose from truly appalling working conditions at my first proper job, where managers seemed to think it was perfectly acceptable to give everyone a crap chair and a tiny desk, the latter of which in my case had two towers and a CRT monitor on top of it. Things gradually changed, but not before I ended up with regular shooting pains up my back and along the length of my arm.

Since then, I’ve become wise to such problems, and attempt to stave off potential issues. My home office set-up includes a decent chair, very carefully positioned, a large screen at the optimum height, a trackpad as a pointer, and also a stylus touchpad for when I need precision pointer control. The mouse is banished.

The problem, though, is that although you do get a very abrupt message when old issues flare up, new ones take a lot longer to bed in. This past week, I’d noticed an issue with the little finger on my left hand. It often feels slightly numb or painful. At times, it feels like it’s been wrenched back, as if I’ve been playing baseball or cricket and messed up a catch. Of course, it’s all down to the iPhone.

My current iPhone is a 6s. I’d previously been using the 5s, and have the habit of, for the most part, using the device in one hand. But the 6s is much larger, and therefore ends up sitting differently in my hand. I quite often, as it turns out, use my little finger to balance and stabilise the iPhone, but since the device sits quite low (in order for me to reach enough of the screen easily), my finger gets stressed and stretched, but so slowly it’s difficult to notice it happening.

I’m fortunate at least to realise this now, and I can take appropriate action. One wily editor suggested “a lawsuit”. But this is Britain, and so the reality will be inwardly tutting, grumbling about the weather (even though that’s entirely unrelated to the issue at hand), and then using the iPhone a little differently. Still, it’s always a good time to take stock of these things. How often are you using electronic devices, desktop computers and notebooks? When did you last think about your own set-up in front of them, rather than just the set-up inside the machines? If you can’t remember, perhaps today’s a good day to start thinking differently about ergonomic and posture yourself.