On Twitter today, a person I admire had a go at someone for supporting Let Toys Be Toys. The reason, seemingly: there are more important things to support.

This is a response I’ve had to my own writing at times, on various subjects, or my public support for certain campaigns. I occasionally write about accessibility in software, such as motion sickness triggers. This writing is sometimes dismissed by people who say I should be writing about actual horrors in the world, like war and famine. (And, no, I’m not kidding.) But I am not a journalist that covers war. I write about what I know. And these smaller things are nonetheless important to many. I don’t know how much influence my articles and feedback had on Apple when iOS 7 was making people sick, but we do now have an OS that is far less likely to make people ill. Did that fix inequality across the entire planet? Of course not, but I still see it as a net win.

Similarly, I fully support the Let Toys Be Toys campaign. I’ve done so since I first heard about its aim to stop limiting children’s interests, due to marketing’s tendency to promote certain toys as specifically ‘for boys’ or ‘for girls’. My support does not mean I don’t want to see greater women’s rights and equality elsewhere. It means I see societal links. When toys are telling young girls to be quiet, pretty, love only pink, and so on, and boys to be noisy, violent, loud, that’s a fucking problem. When advertising almost never has boys and girls playing together, and even board games are gendered, that’s a fucking problem. (I’ve seen pink plastic Jenga ‘for girls’, with ‘gossip suggestions’ on the tiles, and a pink mall Monopoly, because god forbid girls buy property.)

We have room for more than one thing in our heads. And dismissing the likes of Let Toys Be Toys is indicative that someone does not see that overly gendered marketing is indicative of a larger problem that’s endemic in society. Yet we see companies directing girls away from certain kinds of activities, but they somehow act all surprised when there are shortfalls in the number of women active in certain areas of society.

That’s not to say there’s a direct link, but it would be naive to think there’s no link at all. Besides, it’s abhorrent to suggest girls should just sit quietly in a corner and like only pink (and equally to assign certain behaviours to boys). Let kids be kids. Let toys be toys. And let those who want to support something that you don’t see as the most important thing in the world do so without ridiculing them.