Apple has announced WWDC 2020 will be online-only. This shouldn’t come as a surprise. The global health situation made it broadly impossible for Apple to continue with its standard format.

There will doubtless be people who are upset about this change— not least old-hands. I have only been fortunate to attend WWDC once — last year — but even that single experience made it obvious that the buzz extended well beyond the keynote. A big chunk of San Jose was awash with developers, excited at the prospect of talking directly with engineers, and attending superb sessions outlining the latest Apple technologies.

Attempting to replicate this format online will be tricky — not least that direct engagement with Apple engineers. However, Apple in its WWDC 2020 announcement press release also noted its global developer community has more than 23 million registered developers in more than 155 countries and regions.

WWDC 2019 was packed, but it obviously wasn’t that packed. Getting a ticket is essentially a lottery, and those applying are a filtered group: people who have the means (time; money) to travel to the US, and attend the event.

For the general public, probably not a lot will change. Apple will announce a bunch of new stuff at a keynote, and they’ll get the opportunity to play with shiny new toys when the public betas rock up. For some journalists, there will be a change — being present somewhere always provides you with a different viewpoint. But, frankly, we’ll cope. For the developers, though, this year’s WWDC could prove transformative, if Apple manages to truly democratise the event, and ushers in a culture of more equality throughout the wider developer community.